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Posts for tag: Plantar Fasciitis

By Dr. Rowe
September 25, 2018

Regenerative Medicine Part II:

Platelet-Rich Plasma is one regenerative medicine option that many physicians have used for years. The process is simple and done in the office. Patients have their own blood drawn at the physicians office. It is than placed in a centrifuge, and spun down to separate the platelet poor plasma, Buffy Coat (PRP) and red blood cells. The Buffy coat has the greatest number of platelets and growth factors. This is injected in the joint or soft tissue. PRP has been used to decrease inflammation and pain in joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments. It is often used to optimize healing after surgical procedures, or combined with other biologics to enhance bone healing.
PRP suppresses the inflammatory environment through a locally applied concentrate of platelets, leukocytes, and growth factors. PRP therapy aims to control inflammatory factors in a degenerative environment through the secretion of anti-inflammatory factors and signaling effects.
Studies have shown that PRP can be effective with pain reduction and increased healing.

We offer something very unique to our patients with tendon and plantar fascial pain. Patients that have low grade tendinosis in their Achilles’ tendon or chronic plantar fasciitis, we use Tenex Health. This combines ultrasound imaging for visualization with the advanced Tenex microtip for rapid and precise cutting and removal of diseased tendon or plantar fascia. This is different from dry needling, because we’re actually able to remove the diseased tissue. We often combine this with regenerative medicine injecting amnionic allograft after the tenotomy or fasciotomy. This optimizes the healing and recovery time. The pictures show what the Tenex instrument looks like and an example of diseased tendon in the Achilles’ tendon that the procedure was used for. This patient is still in the rehab stages, 4 weeks postop, and states that the pain is significantly less than prior to the surgery. This is an effective minimally invasive procedure that can keep our patients active during their postop course. If you’re currently having lingering tendon pain or chronic plantar fascial pain come see us.

 

   

 

 

By AACI Foot, Leg & Ankle Care Center
February 13, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Plantar Fasciitis  

Heel pain is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the long, dense band of connective tissue (the plantar fascia) that runs from the heel to the ball of the foot.

Repeated strain on the plantar fascia can cause tiny tears in the ligament. As tension and tearing increases, so does inflammation and irritation of the affected area. Risk factors of plantar fasciitis include foot arch problems (flat foot and high arches); excess weight; running; and a tight Achilles tendon.

The most common symptom of plantar fasciitis is gradually developing pain on the bottom of the heel. The pain is usually worst in the morning and after sitting or standing for a long period of time. For some, the pain subsides after walking or stretching.

To reduce pain associated with plantar fasciitis:

  • Rest. Limit and/or avoid activities that make your heel hurt.
  • Ice. Reduce pain and swelling by icing the affected area each day.
  • Stretch. Stretch your heel throughout the day, especially when you first wake up in the morning.
  • Footwear modifications. Wear shoes that provide good arch support and a cushioned sole. Ask your podiatrist about pads and shoe inserts to relieve your heel pain.

When conservative treatments aren't effective, or your pain persists for more than a few weeks, schedule an appointment to discuss your symptoms and treatment options. A podiatrist can recommend an appropriate treatment plan for your individual needs. This may include stretching exercises, shoe padding, orthotic devices, night splints or therapy. Most patients respond to non-surgical treatments, but for pain that won't go away, surgery may be required.

With proper rest and treatment, recovering from plantar fasciitis can take just a few months. Visit us when you first experience pain for a diagnosis and an appropriate treatment plan for your individual needs.